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mid-summer report

August 2, 2013

It’s overcast and still outside right now, as if the weather is waiting to be dared to rain.  We ended July on the farm with lots of windy days but only a quarter-inch of rain.  August arrived with a third of an inch and a spectacular electrical storm.  It’s mid-summer on Quadra.

With the completion of the dock on Pond Near, all our major projects on the farm are done.  Now we can enjoy the remainder of the warm weather and rest our weary muscles.

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The chairs, by the way, spent some time on the bottom of the pond, due to those July winds.  Jude fished them out.

 

The greenhouse, our second newest project, is already paying off.

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Jude’s tomato tree has already enlivened many of our meals.

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Nearby, we’re completing our yard art with some old farm equipment, the circa 1926 Oldsmobile, some rocks and copious sand.

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On the eastish side of the house, barn swallows built a mud nest in the eaves and raised two kids.  This is part of their toilet training.

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Inside the house, Jude dried some of the 24 pounds of cherries we harvested from our two trees.

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Outside, we’re having the best quinoa crop of our five attempts.

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Despite a very wet  June, the creek that feeds our micro-hydro is down to a trickle, so we’ll be shutting it down soon until the rains return in autumn.  It’s time to appreciate the pleasures of the season.  Jude and I plan to watch the peak of the Perseid meteor shower in August as we sip pre-dawn blueberry margaritas on our new dock.

 

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Mary Lou, I’ve got good news.  Please contact me at anchorstruck@gmail.com.

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3 Comments
  1. Gordon Raley permalink
    August 2, 2013 9:23 am

    Really impressive!! Are those tomatoes in the greenhouse?

    • Anonymous permalink
      August 2, 2013 5:50 pm

      They are in the greenhouse. We use a technique where you tie a string from above and attach it to the base stem of the tomato plant then spiral the string around the main stem as it grows to support it. You remove the stems that start to grow in the “v”, trying to keep only one or two main growing branches. Nearby leaves are removed when flowers start to form so the plant puts most of its energy into the fruit. Now – go forth and be fruitful….

  2. Inveterate Teacher permalink
    August 10, 2013 2:27 pm

    Looking at your pictures here is almost as good as taking a vacation. Almost…xo, L

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